DCS860A Emerging Information Technologies I

Instructors:   Chuck Tappert and Sung-Hyuk Cha

Textbooks: Data Mining, Witten and Frank, Elsevier 2005, ISBN 0120884070

Other recommended but not required books

The Emerging Information Technologies two-semester course sequence presents a variety of emerging information technology topics not fully covered in the other DPS course material. The basic materials covered in the first course (book readings and most quizzes) are chosen by the instructor, with additional topics presented by the teams and the guest speakers. The basic materials covered in the second course (readings and most quizzes) are chosen by the students to increase the diversity of topics and to better align them with student interests, with additional topics covered in presentations by the guest speakers. In covering these materials and in the presentations, many dissertation research possibilities will be discussed.

The emerging information technology topics covered this semester typically include the technological life cycle, pervasive computing, small computing devices (handheld and wearable computers), communicating with machines in human modalities (voice, handwriting, and natural language applications), wireless communication, big data and analytics, biometrics, pattern recognition, and data mining. The course goals are to understand the technological life cycle, to learn about the emerging information technologies, their issues and potential impact, and to become aware of various dissertation research possibilities. Although we cover many topics, each year we emphasize some more than others, and this year's emphasis and materials are on the technological life cycle, Kurzweil's Law of Accelerating Returns and The Singularity, biometrics, pattern recognition, and data mining.

This course provides many opportunities to learn about the emerging information technologies, and particularly those areas requiring further research that could become a dissertation topic. The guest speakers bring you to the frontier of current work in their areas of expertise and present possibilities for further work. The course assignments also provide opportunities to investigate topics for potential dissertation work.

Course Website:
The course website presents much of the course information. Blackboard is used for quizzes and protected information. Links in the left menu area of the course website are to:

Classroom etiquette: please turn cell phones off during class time.